Magnesium Deficiency

Magnesium deficiency happens with aging, due to how food is processed and changes in how the body handles magnesium intake and storage. Most people are magnesium deficient. It manifests more as we get older. Symptoms of low magnesium are not always easy to distinguish, and are at times vague. But they are real and mirror the strain on the systems most impacted by low magnesium levels. The brain and the heart under normal circumstances have higher levels of magnesium than other parts of the body, relative to their size. So it makes sense that some of the early manifestations of low magnesium would be manifested in these areas first. The bodily systems impacted the most by magnesium deficiency include: the...

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Magnesium and Muscle

Magnesium is incredibly important for muscles. Of the total magnesium found in the human body, about 60% is located in the skeletal structure. Much of the remaining magnesium is found in muscles, particularly in the heart, skeletal muscle and smooth muscle. This mineral is involved in nearly 800 enzymatic reactions in the body such as glycolysis, the Kreb’s cycle, creatine phosphate formation, nucleic acid synthesis, amino acid activation, cardiac and smooth muscle contractility, cyclic AMP formation, and, most importantly for strength athletes, protein synthesis. What does that mean to you? Magnesium must be available for your body to function normally and for you to achieve your best performance. Magnesium helps generate ATP, which is the energy source for most activity....

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Magnesium 201: Advanced

Advanced Magnesium An adult human body contains about 25 grams of magnesium. This magnesium is stored in various parts of the body: 60% in the skeleton 27% in muscle 7% in other cells Less than 1% extracellular**** Mg++, a Magnesium ion, forms the structural base of our skeletons, muscles and chromosomes. As such, Magnesium is a vital part of our bodily functions and overall structure. It helps facilitate: Enzymate Functions Bone Homeostasis Protein Synthesis Bone, Cell Membrane and Chromosome Structure Muscle Relaxation Transmission of Nerve Signals DNA, RNA, proteins, CHO enzymes, lipids, and the anti-oxidant Glutathione all owe their formation to Mg++ in particular. Mg++ is also necessary for active Ion transport across cell membranes: K+ and Ca++. Magnesium affects...

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